An infant formula naturally made from whole goat milk

Breast fed is best

Breast milk is the normal way to feed a baby and is important for baby’s health. Professional advice should be followed before using an infant formula. Introducing partial bottle feeding could negatively affect breast feeding. Good maternal nutrition is preferred for breast feeding and reversing a decision not to breast feed may be difficult. Infant formula should be used as directed. Proper use of an infant formula is important to the health of the infant. Social and financial implications should be considered when selecting a method of feeding.

Like cow milk, goat milk requires the addition of lactose to reduce levels of protein and minerals. Some added essential fatty acids, folic acid, vitamins B12, C, D, E, iron is also necessary. When making formula from cow milk, many formula manufacturers add extra process steps to remove and replace the milk fat, extract and add whey proteins plus ingredients like nucleotides or oligosaccharides.

Addition of whey proteins to cow milk is favoured by many formula manufacturers to improve the supply of essential and semi-essential amino acids.1 However, DGC’s research confirms whey is not necessary for formula made from goat milk. Goat milk only requires the addition of very small amounts of two amino acids to supply all the essential and semi-essential amino acids needed for infants.2

Many formulas also have the fat from milk replaced with vegetable oils.3 At DGC our process begins with whole goat milk to retain the milk fat before adding lactose, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. Some vegetable oils are still required to top up the essential unsaturated fatty acids in goat milk,4 but the goat milk fat is not removed. The inclusion of goat milk fat retains the medium chain saturated fatty acids in goat milk,5 which are more readily absorbed by infants than long-chain saturate fatty acids.6

The use of whole goat milk also means that nucleotides7 that are already higher in goat compared to cow milk are also retained. As a result, there is no need to add nucleotides when making formula from whole goat milk.

Goat milk may smell of goats if the milk fat is damaged. DGC has developed ways to reduce any damage to the milk fat to prevent any goat smell from developing. This includes strict guidelines for what animals are fed, how they are milked and rapid cooling of milk until it is processed. In addition, the formula making process has also been designed to prevent damage to the goat milk fat in the formula.

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  • 1Janas et al. 1987; Lönnerdal and Chen, 1990; Karlsland Åkesson et al, 1998
  • 2Rutherfurd et al. 2006; Rutherfurd et al. 2008; EFSA 2012
  • 3Delplanque et al, 2015
  • 4Prosser et al, 2010
  • 5Prosser et al, 2010
  • 6Jensen et al 1986; Lindquist & Hernell, 2010
  • 7Prosser, McLaren et al. 2008; Gill, Indyk and Manley-Harris, 2012

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Allergy

There is a common belief that goat milk is a sound alternative for infants or children with cow milk protein allergy. This has resulted in the promotion of goat milk and goat milk products for relief of allergy. However, scientific studies show that goat milk is not always an effective substitute for cow milk in children who are already sensitised to cow milk protein and have a rapid onset, IgE-mediated reaction to cow milk proteins. Only extensively hydrolysed formulas should be used for the dietary management of infants with diagnosed cow milk protein allergy.1

There are several lines of evidence that the strength and type of the immune response to goat and cow milk might still differ. For example, children allergic to cow milk required nearly five times more goat milk to trigger an adverse reaction.2 In another study, 25% of children allergic to cow milk did not react to goat milk at all.3 Children with allergy to cow milk proteins had a lower response to goat milk containing low amounts of αs1-casein.4 Similarly, studies with animals have also shown that lower levels of αs1-casein in goat milk resulted in fewer allergic reactions.5

Further research will help to understand how people might respond differently to goat or cow milk. Until such studies have been completed, it is important that goat milk infant formula is not promoted as a remedy for infants with severe reactions to cow milk.

1 AAP 2000; Koletzko et al, 2012
2 Bellioni-Businco et al 1999
3 Infante et al 2003
4 Ballabio et al, 2011; Albenzio et al 2012; Lisson et al 2014
5 Bevilacqua et al 2001; Hodgkinson et al 2012
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Milk collection & delivery to factory

DGC has end to end production facilities on its site in Hamilton, New Zealand.

Milk is collected from our farms and delivered directly to the production facility. We take great care for our milk, ensuring a consistently lower temperature at all times by insulating our milk trucks. This helps maintain the nutritional integrity of our Goat Milk at all times during transit.
When the whole goat milk is delivered to the site it is checked again for quality before it is processed.

The milk that enters the DGC facility leaves as goat milk formula, in the can that is then sold to our partners’ customers. To ensure the safest possible production system, every element of the production is managed within our single site.

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Can Filling

The DGC can filling facilities are world class. On any day at DGC we can manufacture over 150,000 cans and fill over 90,000 cans. These are then sent to our warehousing and distribution facility where they await final safety tests before being released for export worldwide.

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Animal Welfare and Health

New Zealand has a strict Code of Welfare for Goats. It specifies what is considered to be optimal animal welfare and how this may be achieved for goats farmed under New Zealand conditions. DGC farms are required to follow the New Zealand Code of Welfare for Goats as well as DGC’s own Code of Farm Practice.