Safeguarding Nature

Pasture Fed

Our farmers know how important a high quality diet is to goats. DGC goats thrive on locally grown, on-farm forages such as grasses, clover, lucerne, hay, silage or pasture plants. If short in supply they are sometimes also brought in from other trusted farms within New Zealand.

Milking goats are also given supplementary feeds which are high in protein and energy. One of DGC’s policies is that farmers use only New Zealand or Australian sourced supplementary feeds that are fit for the purpose of producing high quality and safe goat infant formula.

Farming system

Ranging from housed through to on-pasture, DGC farmers have a variety of different farming systems. However, the predominant system is to house goats in open-sided, free-stall barns and feed them on forages brought directly to them. They enjoy natural lighting and fresh air and can move freely through the shelter or barn. Another popular system is on-pasture grazing where the goats are taken to their feed.

Animal welfare

New Zealand has a strict Code of Welfare for Goats. It specifies what is considered to be optimal animal welfare and how this may be achieved for goats farmed under New Zealand conditions. DGC farms are all required to follow the New Zealand Code of Welfare for Goats and DGC’s own Code of Farm Practice.

DGC Code of Farm Practice

The DGC Code of Farm Practice has some expectations that are over and above the minimum requirements expected by the NZ government. Our code is used to set world class benchmarks for milk harvesting, animal welfare, environmental issues, farm dairy presentation and milk quality consistent with infant formula products. It encourages best farming practices for production of goat milk that is fit for the purpose of producing high quality and safe infant formula.

Written by an external auditing company with input from farming experts, DGC staff and dairy goat farmers, the DGC Code of Farm Practice also captures practical knowledge and experience with milking goats.

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Blending

Our state of the art blending plant enables us to add the additional nutrients required to meet regulatory and specific product requirements where necessary.

Spray Drying

DGC’s spray drying plant has been designed specifically to process goat infant formula.

Spray drying is the process of removing water from the milk, producing the beginning of the fine powder that is eventually found in the finished product.

Our spray dryers are kept meticulously clean and the most recent, second spray dryer was built in 2015.

An infant goat milk formula made without palm oil

The fat content of formula must be modified to include several essential fatty acids. Many formulas are based on skim milk where the milk fat is replaced by vegetable oils, including palm oil.1

DGC has adopted an alternative approach, using whole goat milk to retain milk fat. Vegetable oils are still added to top up the essential unsaturated fatty acids in goat milk, but it is not necessary to use palm oil if milk fat is included in the formula.

Our research has also shown that there is also no need to use highly modified ingredients such as OPO.2

1 Delplanque et al, 2015
2 Prosser et al, 2010

Animal Welfare and Health

New Zealand has a strict Code of Welfare for Goats. It specifies what is considered to be optimal animal welfare and how this may be achieved for goats farmed under New Zealand conditions. DGC farms are required to follow the New Zealand Code of Welfare for Goats as well as DGC’s own Code of Farm Practice.